How to test multiple variables against a value?

2019-08-19 06:13发布

I'm trying to make a function that will compare multiple variables to an integer and output a string of three letters. I was wondering if there was a way to translate this into Python. So say:

x = 0
y = 1
z = 3
mylist = []

if x or y or z == 0 :
    mylist.append("c")
if x or y or z == 1 :
    mylist.append("d")
if x or y or z == 2 :
    mylist.append("e")
if x or y or z == 3 : 
    mylist.append("f")

which would return a list of

["c", "d", "f"]

Is something like this possible?

21条回答
地球回转人心会变
2楼-- · 2019-08-19 06:49

Your problem is more easily addressed with a dictionary structure like:

x = 0
y = 1
z = 3
d = {0: 'c', 1:'d', 2:'e', 3:'f'}
mylist = [d[k] for k in [x, y, z]]
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Explosion°爆炸
3楼-- · 2019-08-19 06:50

You can try the method shown below. In this method, you will have the freedom to specify/input the number of variables that you wish to enter.

mydict = {0:"c", 1:"d", 2:"e", 3:"f"}
mylist= []

num_var = int(raw_input("How many variables? ")) #Enter 3 when asked for input.

for i in range(num_var): 
    ''' Enter 0 as first input, 1 as second input and 3 as third input.'''
    globals()['var'+str('i').zfill(3)] = int(raw_input("Enter an integer between 0 and 3 "))
    mylist += mydict[globals()['var'+str('i').zfill(3)]]

print mylist
>>> ['c', 'd', 'f']
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【Aperson】
4楼-- · 2019-08-19 06:51

To check if a value is contained within a set of variables you can use the inbuilt modules itertools and operator.

For example:

Imports:

from itertools import repeat
from operator import contains

Declare variables:

x = 0
y = 1
z = 3

Create mapping of values (in the order you want to check):

check_values = (0, 1, 3)

Use itertools to allow repetition of the variables:

check_vars = repeat((x, y, z))

Finally, use the map function to create an iterator:

checker = map(contains, check_vars, check_values)

Then, when checking for the values (in the original order), use next():

if next(checker)  # Checks for 0
    # Do something
    pass
elif next(checker)  # Checks for 1
    # Do something
    pass

etc...

This has an advantage over the lambda x: x in (variables) because operator is an inbuilt module and is faster and more efficient than using lambda which has to create a custom in-place function.

Another option for checking if there is a non-zero (or False) value in a list:

not (x and y and z)

Equivalent:

not all((x, y, z))
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放荡不羁爱自由
5楼-- · 2019-08-19 06:54

As stated by Martijn Pieters, the correct, and fastest, format is:

if 1 in {x, y, z}:

Using his advice you would now have separate if-statements so that Python will read each statement whether the former were True or False. Such as:

if 0 in {x, y, z}:
    mylist.append("c")
if 1 in {x, y, z}:
    mylist.append("d")
if 2 in {x, y, z}:
    mylist.append("e")
...

This will work, but if you are comfortable using dictionaries (see what I did there), you can clean this up by making an initial dictionary mapping the numbers to the letters you want, then just using a for-loop:

num_to_letters = {0: "c", 1: "d", 2: "e", 3: "f"}
for number in num_to_letters:
    if number in {x, y, z}:
        mylist.append(num_to_letters[number])
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Deceive 欺骗
6楼-- · 2019-08-19 06:56

You can use dictionary :

x = 0
y = 1
z = 3
list=[]
dict = {0: 'c', 1: 'd', 2: 'e', 3: 'f'}
if x in dict:
    list.append(dict[x])
else:
    pass

if y in dict:
    list.append(dict[y])
else:
    pass
if z in dict:
    list.append(dict[z])
else:
    pass

print list
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迷人小祖宗
7楼-- · 2019-08-19 06:57

I think this will handle it better:

my_dict = {0: "c", 1: "d", 2: "e", 3: "f"}

def validate(x, y, z):
    for ele in [x, y, z]:
        if ele in my_dict.keys():
            return my_dict[ele]

Output:

print validate(0, 8, 9)
c
print validate(9, 8, 9)
None
print validate(9, 8, 2)
e
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